Saturday, April 11, 2009

'Maxwelton'

'Maxwelton' was built for John Rogers Maxwell Sr. c. 1898 by William B. Tubby in Glen Cove. Maxwell was president of the Atlas Portland Cement Company (which supplied the cement for the Panama Canal) and was vice-president of the Long Island Rail Road. Most of 'Maxwelton' was razed c. 1950.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

One wing of this house remains overlooking LI sound and a new addition was added to it in the late 80's. During the 60'& 70's the Berlitz' s of the Berlitz School of language lived there

Anonymous said...

The water tower also survives. The house in question - is it the house that has the oval shaped pool with the tennis court below?

Anonymous said...

Yes thats the house

Anonymous said...

If I were to guess I would say the east side of the house contains the original wing?????? Next to the water tower - those red roofed buildings - were they stables/outbuildings from the estate? Thanks

charles said...

Where in Glen Cove is this house? Thank you.

Zach said...

http://wikimapia.org/#lat=40.8770703&lon=-73.6533898&z=19&l=0&m=a&v=2

Anonymous said...

The muse of Guillaume Apollinaire, harbinger of surrealism, came to work here as a governess in the middle 1900s. Her name was Annie Playden.

Anonymous said...

It doesn't look as if the "new" wing of Maxwell's house is extant in the photo referenced here -http://wikimapia.org/#lat=40.8770703&lon=-73.6533898&z=19&l=0&m=a&v=2 - The "new" wing was finished in 1899 to serve as a summer extension for the existing main house built a couple of years before. When the main house was demolished in the 1950s the "boat room" behind the porte-cochere was moved to the "new" wing that survived the demolition. If the wing exists in the photo it would be to the right of the chimney at the lower left of roof structure. If this is the original chimney, then perhaps the wing does exist indicating the "boat room" would be the next roof to the right. J. Colby BrickTower@aol.com

Anonymous said...

The red-roof buildings closest to the Tower were part of the original greenhouse and stable structures. The largest of "red-roof" buildings furthest away from the Tower was built in the 1960s to match the buildings extant nearest the Tower by O'Brien a contractor who helped demolish the 1964 NY World's Fair. Mr. Maxwell's gatehouse is still standing between Whitney Circle and Old Estate Road but the gate and gate columns were taken down years ago. J. Colby BrickTower@aol.com

Anonymous said...

At Number 55 Red Spring Lane the original Maxwellton Carriage House and Caretakers home survives. The carriage house remains unchanged since the day it was built.
AT 57 Red Spring Lane the second entrance Gates, columns and part of the original wall extents to number 55. There were three mansions built on the Estate. The original for John Roberts Maxwell his son’s Howard Maxwell and his daughter Louise Maxwell Whitney. When Mrs. Whitney passed she left the carriage house and the caretakers home to her caretaker. In 1963 the property containing both structures was purchased by Frank & Eleanor D’Amico