Monday, December 14, 2009

When 'Wheatly' Was Up For Auction

A brochure advertising the auction of 'Wheatly', the Edwin D. Morgan III estate designed by McKim, Mead & White c. 1890 in Old Westbury (what was then Wheatly). This auction brochure follows THIS brochure when the house was for sale. No buyer had been found and the property was auctioned leading to the demolition of the center portion of the house (seen directly above) and the subdivision of the estate grounds in the early 1950s. Click HERE for more on 'Wheatly'.



Brochure courtesy of SPLIA.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

i read back through all the comments and did mary burns ever get that book to you? this is a great estate enclosed as it was like a little medieval town. it would be nice to see what the interiors looked like now. both houses left are not exactly shacks. of the other stuff - water tower etc. - what still remains? any gardens?

Zach said...

There are a handful of cottages, a couple of garden walls, some paths and probably more that is covered with plant growth.

An Aesthete's Lament said...

The chapel is just grand! And I mean that in terms of size, by the way.

Anonymous said...

The original two end building/wings are still up and being lived in. The chapel is still there and appears to have had some restoration work and lots of upkeeping. It look like an old spanish villa. There are some other buildings up on the property still standing, and the coutyard entrance still has a hint of its former grandeur. You can drive right up to the place if you know where to go... wink wink Zachy...

Zach said...

^...There is a tab under 'Estates' entitled 'Wheatly' (found here: http://www.oldlongisland.com/search/label/Wheatly). All of the buildings are photographed and posted.

Anonymous said...

The Morgans also had a Newport, RI house called Beacon Rock designed by McKim, Mead & White. See below:

http://www.beaconrocknewport.com/history.html

Doug

The Down East Dilettante said...

The Morgans must have been terrific clients, because both houses are grand concept, and push the envelope in interesting ways. There are some evocative pictures of Wheatley in "A Monograph of the Work of McKim, Mead, & White", available in several editions.