Tuesday, January 19, 2010

The Glenn Stewart Farm Group

Another farm group designed by Alfred Hopkins, this time for Glenn Stewart, a diplomat, on Feeks Lane in Lattingtown c. 1914. A 1915 map lists Greta Hostetter (Mrs. Glenn Stewart) as proprietor and a 1927 map shows Anson Wood Burchard as owner. Hostetter's mother Allene married A.W. Burchard sometime later in her life (Burchard's estate 'Birchwood' was across the street). I do not know if there was a house that accompanied these outbuildings. Click HERE to see the farm group on google earth.




Pictures from Architectural Record, 1915.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

what's the house right next door with the long drive? it almost looks like the grounds flow into the farm group.

Anonymous said...

http://www.nassaucountyny.gov/mynassauproperty/viewphoto.jsp?txtSection=29&txtBlock=M&txtLot=255&txtSuffix=0&txtBldg=&txtCondo=&txtYear=2012

An Aesthete's Lament said...

Hostetter's mother was the marrying kind, having gone to the altar five times. Husband 1 was Theodore Hostetter. Husband 2 was Morton Colton Nichols. Husband 3 was Anson Wood Burchard. Husband 4 was His Serene Highness Prince Henry XXXIII of Reuss. And Husband 5 was Count Paul Kotzebue.

An Aesthete's Lament said...

Described by a cousin as "a liar, a womanizer, and a no-account," Glenn Stewart smoked cigarettes with a gold cigarette holder and once attempted to blow up a section of train tracks when he was a student at Yale, in order to get back at some pretty girls who turned down an invitation to one of his parties—the bomb blew up prematurely, blinding one of his eyes and scarring his face. He had a bizarre house in Maryland, a castle. See http://www.dupontcastle.com/castles/pink.htm. His first wife, Greta Hostetter, died after four years of marriage. His second wife was Jacqueline Archer, an Irish heiress, who dyed her poodles to match the interiors of her automobiles. (All into from "Wye Island" by Boyd Gibbons.)

Zach said...

Wow....this guy was something.

Anonymous said...

The princess/countess is mentioned in the Michael Gross book, 740 PARK