Monday, February 1, 2010

'Shoremond'

'Shoremond', the Ormond Gerald Smith estate designed by Hoppin & Koen c. 1910 on Centre Island. The 12 bedroom estate consisted of almost a mile of waterfront on the Long Island Sound. Smith was the president of Street and Smith Publications Inc. which produced such magazines as Popular, Top Notch, Ainslee's and Picture Play. His obituary says his firm printed more than 3,600 titles since their inception. The estate had two subsequent owners before it was demolished in the 1940s. Click HERE to see where 'Shoremond' stood on google earth.







Pictures from Architectural Record, 1916. Click below to see the remnants of 'Shoremond' in a 1966 aerial shot.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

i know this is a dumb question but if they didn't really break the estate up for development, why did they demolish a 30 year old house? granted the two houses that replaced it aren't exactly tar paper shacks but if they were going to build a house almost as big, why not keep the original that the paint was hardly dry in/

The Down East Dilettante said...

the large house on the site wasn't built immediately after construction, but rather only a four or five years ago.

Anonymous said...

but still why demolish the house if they weren't gona build anything there anyway

Anonymous said...

Taxes on an estate were focused mainly on the value of the structure. Huge houses paid huge taxes. After tge depression mansions on this scale were considered out of style. The trend moved toward more suburban looking large homes making large mansions unsaleable white elephants with a major tax burden. Add to that the cost of coal for heat and the staff needed to maintain the placr. Unable to pay the operating costs and with no buyers the owners tore down the houses and subdivided the property.