Tuesday, August 10, 2010

'Indian Neck Hall' Derelict Garden Feature

A derelict garden feature at 'Indian Neck Hall', the Frederick G. Bourne estate designed by Ernest Flagg between 1897-1900 in Oakdale. I assume there would have been an additional dozen or so columns that have long since disappeared. Click HERE for more on 'Indian Neck Hall'.


9 comments:

Anonymous said...

I see where the collanade used to be. That, with some green and well manicured lawn and it must have been a nice setting.Do you know what the building behind was used for?When ever I was naughty growing up, my mom always threatened to send me to LaSalle Military Academy. Her fear tactics always worked.

Zach said...

I think it was some kind of outbuilding for INH that was converted for use under LaSalle. As for the specific purpose I'm not sure.

Turner Pack Rats said...

aren't there any old postcards or photos that show this feature and, for that matter, the landscaping which is non existent now.(surprise!) also, i'm assuming some of those outbuildings were farm group and stable etc. maybe you could give us a guided tour of whats left.

security word def - "rusli" - a certain radio commentators vanity plate (and i do mean vanity)

magnus said...

A bit off topic perhaps so forgive me: Yesterday at what I think is one of New York's best treasures, Archivia (Lexington between 71st-72nd street, a bookstore specializing in architecture, the arts, interiors, everything your readers love), I purchased a book on the gardens of Newport, illustrated with those great, hand colored glass slides so beloved before the era of Kodachrome. One of the early chapters is on the famous Blue Garden of Mrs. Arthur Curtiss James. The author includes a contemporary description of the absolutely astonishing party that Mrs. James held in 1913 to inaugurate the two acre garden, replete with a troup of actors dressed as nymphs, elfs, etc who frolicked in the pools and fountains. The chapter ends in our time as the author visits the almost impenetrable wildnerness where the garden stood, and uncovers bits and pieces of its former glory. Gardening is truly the most ephemeral of arts and I find nothing as evocative of forgotten dreams and hopes and aspirations as a ruined garden.

The Down East Dilettante said...

continuing off topic with Magnus, so true, so true. One used to roam the ruined Bar Harbor estate grounds---a toppled column here, a cracked fountain there.....

The Ancient said...

derelict garden feature

I'm going to use that next time I'm faced with a form requiring me to list my occupation.

Zach said...

TPR -

I have yet to come across any old pictures of this feature. There is an 'Images of America' book on Oakdale which has a chapter devoted to old pictures relating to INH....some interiors and exteriors and some shots of Bourne and his family....none of the gardens however.

Poe Dettrow said...

Magnus,
Archivia sounds heavenly. I wish we had a comparable store in Chicago.

My word verification: "Dedionce," who must be Beyonce's sister.

lsma79 said...

Maybe I can help. The garden at LaSalle is the old rose garden that had a trelus of roses to form a tunnel to the columns that you see in the foto.It was beautiful in its day. Cadets used to take pictures with their girlfriends and family members their.
The building is called Molloy Hall and was the dormitory for the seniors of LaSalle. Under classman dormed at St Josephs onthe other side of the campus.
I lived their for four years. For I am a former cadet.