Friday, October 15, 2010

'Claverack'

'Claverack', the Thomas H. Barber estate designed by Robert Henderson Robertson c. 1892 in Southampton. Click HERE to see the brochure from when 'Claverack' was for sale. Click HERE to see 'Claverack' on google earth. The house is currently for sale through Sotheby's with a price upon request, click HERE to see the listing.



Listing photos from Sotheby's.

8 comments:

The Down East Dilettante said...

Lovely place

Anonymous said...

That entry hall is amazing!! Hope it finds a loving new owner. I love the Hamptons...but not that fond of the people.

Anonymous said...

Zach...not to take away from this post, but whatever happened to "Woodside" in Muttontown. Did it get auctioned off to a developer, or is it still up for grabs?

Zach said...

It sold at auction 6 months ago for $19 million. Not sure what the future holds though.

Anonymous said...

To me, this house, beautiful.

Ralph said...

Zach ,
Your best week yet in selections for featured estates!
Do you think you could post some things further on the Arthur Vining Davis estate in Mill Neck? That's one of my favorites.
Thanks
Ralph

charles said...

In regard to Woodside... As I was also interested in the outcome of the sale, I searched for info on the internet. It seems that the man who bought the property is renovating the house and maintaining its use as a country club. I hope he is successful.

I was so interested in the comments on Broadhollow. It was so much fun to learn the fascinating tidbits shared by the bloggers.

Anonymous said...

At a glance this house looked very familiar to me. I wasn't sure why at first, but then I realized that it closely resembles the old Van Rensselaer Manor House, which was built by Stephen Van Rensselar in Albany, NY in 1765. The name "Claverack" was familiar to me too, and Claverack, NY is the location of another old Van Rensselaer property. That one is known as the Lower V.R. Manor House, After googling the homeowner's names it all makes sense. Mrs. Thomas H. Barber was a great grandaughter of Stephen Van Rensselaer. The original manor house in Albany was moved to Williams College aound the turn of the century, and after serving as a frat house for a number of years, was demolished in 1973, but evidently Mrs. Barber had her architect use that old family home as a model for her new Long Island house. This page has a postcard image of the original manor house. It's not a great pic, but in comparing the two houses, the architectural similarities are obvious.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/carlsoldphotos/2862894710/