Monday, November 29, 2010

'Mallow'

'Mallow', the Walter Farwell estate designed by William Welles Bosworth c. 1918 in Oyster Bay Cove. Farwell was the son of Charles B. Farwell, United States Senator from Illinois and was vice president of John V. Farwell & Co., a dry goods firm. Today the estate operates as the East Woods School. Click HERE to see 'Mallow' on google earth and HERE on bing.





Click below to see 'Mallow' undeveloped in a 1953 aerial shot. Pictures from the Library of Congress.

16 comments:

Anonymous said...

How cool! This is the first time I've ever seen these rooms by Ruby Ross Wood- and the first time they have ever been shown publically. A small sitting room (not shown in your pix) in Mallow has been somewhat famous since 1974 when Billy Baldwin published his own snap shot of this room in "Billy Baldwin Remembers". He stated that the color of this room, "Coromandel black-brown," and its lacquered finish was the original inspiration for the paint treatment of the walls in his now famous, forever copied and much photographed studio apartment.

Thank you O.L.I. you've completed the picture!

Kevin said...

Mallow has been one of my favorites houses ever since I saw a picture of it online somewhere. Great pictures.

Anonymous said...

I only know this place from a child's perspective and playing sports against East Woods. I remember the whole setting as a bit enchanted.

The Down East Dilettante said...

I've always been crazy about this house...nice gutsy early Georgian. I've just sent you a copy of a 1920 real estate ad for the house, which says that the brick came from a demolished plantation house in Virginia (I wonder which one?), and the staircase from the Bulwer Lytton house in England. The Farwells certainly had above average taste.

I didn't see a link here, but I'd swear that you also posted a real estate brochure of Mallow some time back?

The Down East Dilettante said...

PS. I think the library is also sensational---a scaled down, simplified version of Robert Adam's great country house libraries, wonderfully and chicly underfurnished

Anonymous said...

What do you suppose of the two pieces of Art in the dining room?. Painting?, tapestry?. What's the motif?.

John J Tackett said...

With the possible exception of the half round rug in the stairhall, I was quite taken with the interiors. Thanks for the exceptional post!

ChipSF said...

This is such an elegant house! And the interiors are not only elegant but look surprisingly comfortable in a formal sort of way.

The Down East Dilettante said...

Actually John J, that half round rug, which appears to be an 18th century Aminsister, is an example of what, for me, was Mrs. Farwell's boldness in taste---beauty over perfection----I suspect the colors were faded and beautiful.

TOPSY said...

This is the house were the original idea for a Lacquered Chocolate Brown room came from??? The concept that every major decorator has done and re-done over and over for decades? How fascinating-please show us the room and tell us more!

The Down East Dilettante said...

Topsy, there is a view of a corner of the brown room in Mallow in this post on the Peak of Chic: http://thepeakofchic.blogspot.com/2008/06/who-influenced-who.html

A fuller view may be found in Billy Baldwin's own books.

Anonymous said...

I have been through the house many times and since it became a school it has been instutionalized.
The handsome English antique stair was sold, the octangular library has a balcony no more since the
ceiling was added the same hight
as the other first floor rooms.
I also believe the sculptures and antique marble fireplaces were sold. And finally the large cross shaped pool to the rear has been filled in.

Anonymous said...

How sad, too bad these Instutions don't get it that someday they may want to sell, or need funds to repair or renovate and the more in original condition this old house are, the more they will qualify for grants and funds. Not to mention a mulitated house has less value than one in original condition, so if they do have to sell (maybe to relocate) they'd get more money. Absolute idiots. At least if you have to alter, don't throw it away or sell it, store it. I once had a conversation with a women who so problem mutilating (sp) her historic home. I asked her, if you had just spent 14 million dollars buying the Mona Lisa, for example, would you then change the frame, have the dress color altered and have her hair style altered? she responded, "Well of course not, that would be idotic...." "Well I responded, that's what your doing with your house." At least I got her to keep the original siding and some other features........ (excuse my spelling, it's getting late and on old house over dose from this blog!)

B. Hedges said...

The owner of this beautiful estate was my late husband's great Aunt Mildred. His father was the estate executor. My sister-in-law and my husband remembered playing hide and seek there when they were little, before it became a school. They said there was a bookcase in the library that swung around, just like in those old movies !

Anonymous said...

Mr. Farwell was blind..result of two seperate accidents. In the late 30's and early 40's my Mother read to him on a regular basis, especially material that would prepare him for his next trip somewhere in the world. Nothing was ever moved in his library and he could walk around the room as though sighted.
S. O'Brien - Canada

Edward Young said...

Another outstanding post, Zach! I have written a roman à clef about going to school here in the late sixties, as well as Mona Bismarck and Balenciaga, and her life in Paris.

Fitzgerald and his oeuvre get a lot of play in the narrative arc, as both Mona and my aunt and uncle, the screenwriting Hacketts, were close to Scott. The hot link goes to my pinterest page with contemporary photos of "Mallow."

Happy to email a free copy of the book to anyone who wants to read it~ ed young