Thursday, March 31, 2011

'Elm Court' Advertisement

An advertisement for 'Elm Court', the Edgar F. Luckenbach Sr. estate designed by Egerton Swartwout c. 1921 in Sands Point. Click HERE to see the brochure from when 'Elm Court' was for sale. The house was demolished in 1977.

12 comments:

The Devoted Classicist said...

It was built on speculation? Was that common for early 1920s estates on Long Island?

Anonymous said...

Why was this beautiful mansion torn down? Does anybody know. It was a nice one. What is there now?

Zach said...

Follow the 'Click HERE' link and your question will be answered.

Anonymous said...

Oh, no!

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/ct-met-north-shore-affordable-housing20110330,0,2289242.story

Zach said...

This is an interesting side note, I don't have a date for the advertisement but Luckenbach lived in the house for sure in the late 20s through the 30s. If this ad lists the house as recently built perhaps Luckenbach didn't commission it but simply bought it after it was built. The NYTimes mentioned he had another house named Shorewood which also happens to be the name of a street just a ways down from what is today Elm Ct.

Nita {ModVintageLife} said...

I found your blog when reading info on Lands End. I am fascinated by these old estates. Just wanted to leave a comment telling you how much I enjoy your blog. Thanks for providing all the photos and information.

commentator8 said...

It really is sad when your descriptions close with "the house was demolished in...", it just pains my heart.

Also, I am reminded on a daily basis via your blog that the only way to say these owner (and even designers') names out loud is with a locked jaw and drawn out vowels of the WASP accent.

"Egbert Swartworth", oh dear.

Try it yourself, it's a fun pastime. Sometimes I make up mock scenarios: "Egbert, can I trouble you ask Walter to get me another highball of the 40 year, neat?"

HalfPuddingHalfSauce said...

http://wikimapia.org/#lat=40.8566851&lon=-73.6906028&z=18&l=0&m=b&show=/16156118/Elm-Court-Remains

House and gardens can be seen at the historicaerials link.

Doug Floor Plan said...

I have a floor plan question (surprising I know) -- am I correct that the front door for this house is that relatively small door that is almost squashed by the huge raised window of the main staircase over it? I remember reading or seeing something once that indicated that’s where it was … & it is the most logical place for guests to enter this house.

I like this house even though it’s a little quirky looking (to me). & it’s interesting to see that not all the mansions being built during that era were custom ordered.

The Devoted Classicist said...

Doug Floor Plan: That is just a little window under the big arched window of the staircase. The main entrance to the house would have been through the porch and into the hall (and not directly into the stairhall). There are many houses that are entered under the landing of a staircase, but this was not one of them.

Doug Floor Plan said...

Thank you again Classicist -- I'm still trying to remember where I saw something that made me think what I did; plus I still think the stairhall is the more logical place to enter this house -- flow of traffic, plus the 'porch' on the floor plan really is a porch & not a loggia (it looks loggia-est to me).

Doug Floor Plan said...

correction -- loggia-esque.

I could say it, I just couldn't spell if for a moment.