Wednesday, May 18, 2011

'The Moorings'

'The Moorings', the Louis Gordon Hammersley Sr. estate enlarged c. 1930 but built pre-1914 (for someone else) in Sands Point. Hammersley was a director with the United States Trust Co. and owned real estate in Manhattan. He was also the president of Walker Signal & Equipment Company. The house is currently for sale for $12,500,000, click HERE to see the listing via Prudential Douglas Elliman.



Listing photos via Prudential Douglas Elliman.

11 comments:

Turner Pack Rats said...

WOW - that pic that shows the little pool-bigger pool - ocean is pretty spectacular. it makes it look like one flows right into the other even tho separated by height and distance. i'm impressed.
i'm puzzled, however. is it just the perspective? the left gable seems to flow into a dormer but not the right but neither show from the back. que?
kind of a narrow lot but at least it has good looking neighbors and, hey, its on the ocean, so who cares.
great landscaping, whammo interiors but if i sat down on that porch with all the wicker, i'd never get up again.

security word def - "irwol" - old Dutch word for when you get belly button lint in your ear.

magnus said...

I was about to post a venomous comment about placing the pool so close to the house until I saw the 2nd photograph and must agree with TPR- it looks pretty spectacular IF, "in the flesh" the pool does seem to be an extension of the Long Island Sound. But taxes of $100,000 per year? it's a wonder that anyone lives in Nassau County.

Doug Floor Plan said...

A very nice house & beautiful grounds that really compliment the house (my opinion). I’m most impressed that that long, inviting back porch is still all porch & not a porch/sun room/extended den. The dock must be brand new because it doesn’t show up on Bing views – I suspect the sellers put it in as a selling feature & wonder if it adds dollar-for-dollar value (that’s a question for anyone who’s knowledgeable about LI docks).

TPR – I think the answer to your question is that this house tapers in the middle with the porches extending beyond the body of the house. If you look a) in the second picture Zach posted, looking from the pool back up to the house you can see part of a roofline on the right just above the porch, & b) on the Bing view with north at the bottom you can see the front & back porches extend beyond the house. I agree it’s unexpected that the front is not at all symmetrical while the back is nothing but.

Anonymous said...

I usually tend to go ga-ga over the more grand Georgians,Chateau's or Tutors...but this house looks so inviting and cozy....and those views are spectacular!!!

The Down East Dilettante said...

I normally don't care for infinity pools, one of the cliches of the Hedge Fund era, but this one is actually pretty good

The Down East Dilettante said...

I normally don't care for infinity pools, one of the cliches of the Hedge Fund era, but this one is actually pretty good

lil' gay boy said...

DED, I agree, I agree...

;-)

A well-executed infinity edge, this west facing property (most desirable; sunsets over the water and Manhattan skyline views!) is perfectly suited, with its downslope to the Sound, for this infinity edge pool (the spa is well-executed, too).

[Just an aside ––– as a gift to some friends abroad, I posted a series of videos of our mutual travels; this one (about half way through) shows a westward-facing sunset sequence over the Sound from Sea Cliff, a little further east of this Sands Point gem. Other parts of the vid may look familiar to some.]

As for this lovely, understated home, the interior decor is a tad over-the-top in spots but the exquisite bones of this home demonstrate how good essential structure can hide (or at least minimize) a multitude of sins. TPR a quick look at the Google Maps view will show the graceful sweep of the front end gables into the main body of the house better than the Bing bird's eye view.

Doug, many Long Island municipalities, faced with a number of estates being broken up into smaller parcels, have placed a moratorium on putting in new docks; if one was not grandfathered in it can be next to impossible, even with copious bribes, to get a permit for one. So yes, dollar-for-dollar, a house from the 30s with a newly-renovated dock is a prize indeed.

Security word - guenpre: Creole for a food cart that serves swan-meat po' boys.

HalfPuddingHalfSauce said...

Google Book link added to "Deephaven" American Homes and Garden February 1906 from yesterdays post -

http://wikimapia.org/#lat=40.8455305&lon=-73.731662&z=18&l=0&m=b&show=/19875878/Deephaven

Anonymous said...

It's interesting. I looked this estate up on Zillow. The address is 10 Hicks Lane. The currect value by Zillow is $4,565,000. As nice as this house is, although, not one of my favorites, this one is way overpriced. It seems squeezed in by estates on either side.

Anonymous said...

I agree...though I love this home, 12 million is way out of line, as are many of the mansions for sale on Long Island...it's insane and the cause of the loss of most of these great homes....

And what was the fate of Chateau des Thons....will it soon be landfill?

lil' gay boy said...

Anon 8:47, I'm beginning to think "Zillow" is Gaelic for LSD ––– a quick peek at the listing for the house next door to me places it at $1.3 million; at least three times its asking price.

I have never been able to accurately determine just how those happily hallucinogenic folks over at zillow.com calculate their claims, but it seems to be a far, far cry from reality.

I suspect that not only the size of the lot (possible subdivision?) along with the ancillary garage/guest quarters, and a soup├žon of the real estate mantra, "location, location, location" can account for the asking price, especially when one throws in unrealistic expectations of the seller.

As for Chateau des Thons, qui sait?

Security word - reigsa: a king is in the 'hood.