Friday, August 26, 2011

'Little Burlees' Encore

Another article on 'Little Burlees', the Edward T. Cockcroft estate designed by Albro & Lindeberg c. 1905 in East Hampton. Click HERE and HERE for more on 'Little Burlees'. Article from International Studio, 1910.




12 comments:

The Down East Dilettante said...

And thus is made clear the distinction between 'driving' entrance and 'front' door, with its path to the street---back in the day when people actually entered from the street. Interesting that the likely more used door was given secondary design importance, and the living room door, more for composition's sake, the important treatment. And the house continues to charm. Interesting to read about the 'careful consideration' given to placing the windows, as of course, the more recent designer mucked up the original composition

Anonymous said...

this house was a beauty, the more recent imitation while somewhat faithful to the original has lost all the charm and useful layout that was often Lindeberg's stock 'n trade

Doug Floor Plan said...

DED, thanks for clarifying the door difference; I suspect the Cockcrofts didn't want to look out their windows towards the beach & see a bunch of cars in the way.

I have more sympathy for what the current owners did & didn't do knowing now the place burned during remodeling -- I'll assume they wanted a faithful restoration but after the fire they said, "You know, as long as we're starting from scratch ..."

Doug Floor Plan said...

Oops, I should have added:
Of course the owners should no longer claim to live in an Albor & Lindeberg designed home -- because they don't.

HalfPuddingHalfSauce said...

http://books.google.com/books?id=g3IvAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

"The placing of shadows" how often do you hear that in the design of homes these days? It would have behooved the current owners to have followed the use of the muted pastels{buff, pale green, salmon and grays} instead of the standard for the neighborhood - white. I no the basics - is the formal furniture pictured Louis XVI in style with its straight legs?

New book discovery for me - "Ferguson's castle: A dream remembered" with a forward by Vincent Price and introduction by Jean Dixon. Odd combination of characters for a tribute to one of the Gold Coast lost treasures.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0682491543

Numerous b/w photos, floor plans, descriptive text.

Old Grey Dog said...

Most everyone speaks of Lindeberg's talent, but tend to overlook Albro's accomplishements. Lewis Colt Albro came from Pittsfield, Mass., and practiced out of McKim, Mead & White's office, where he met, and later partnered with Harrie Lindeberg. In 1902 Albro was the supervising architect for the Charles Dana Gibson townhouse on East 73rd Street in New York. Gibson's sister, Josephine, accompanied her brother on daily inspections of the house as it was being built, and met and was befriended by Albro. Later, on a walk through Central Park, Lewis Albro proposed to Josephine. Although she declined they remained faithful friends. When he died, early in 1924, he requested her presence while on his deathbed ~ and she hurriedly came from her home in Washington, D.C., to grant his request. Stanford White gave Albro the assignment of selecting
a chandelier for an important room, for one of his commissions.
After the room was finished and White had inspected it, Albro asked him, "How did you like the chandelier, Mr. White ?" To which White replied, "Splendid ~ I didn't notice it !" Gibson's sister, Josephine Gibson Knowlton, who I knew and frequently visited at her home in Bristol, Rhode Island, told me, also, that Dana gave Albro his first commission which was to design his summer home on 700-Acre Island off of Ilesboro, Maine.

The Down East Dilettante said...

Doug, true enough about the rebuilding.

HP&HS, I too was charmed by 'placing of shadows' and the evocative descriptions of the color process...

and yes, the furniture is Louis XVI-ish---

Old grey---one has sailed often past the charming Gibson house

Doug Floor Plan said...

DED, thanks for backing me up; I understand the temptation of making more changes than originally intended if given the opportunity but also think the closest the current owners can now legitimately claim is they live in an Albro & Lindeberg INSPIRIED home.

HPHS, thanks for the link to the book – FYI, 11 of the 100 country houses pictured are on Long Island (of course I counted; I’m also sending copies of the 11 to Zach).

OGD, thanks for sharing a really interesting story.

Old Grey Dog said...

One further word on Lewis Albro and Josephine Gibson . . . after brother Charles Dana Gibson's house was finished, in 1903, or '04, Albro invited Josephine to a dinner he was giving and asked her to wear her black velvet gown, that he prefered her wearing when he took her out. To ensure that she would, he presented her, several days in advance, with a pair of black-jet earings, the very first pair of earings that she had ever had for herself. She later discovered that they were very expensive, as she had to replace one that she had lost ! He was a first-class gent in every respect !

Zach said...

Otto's looking and feeling better everyday...slowly starting to use his leg again.

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6087/6088870562_5c1c8a67fa_o.jpg

Doug Floor Plan said...

Yea for Otto! I'm sure not wearing a cone around his head is a big relief. I'm also sure Otto has better nursing care than many a Gold Coast scion.

Anonymous said...

The little guy's looking alot more happier....look at his smile.