Thursday, October 20, 2011

The Entrance to 'Wheatly'

The main entrance and gate lodge at 'Wheatly', the E.D. Morgan III estate designed by McKim, Mead & White between 1890-1900 in Old Westbury. Click HERE and HERE for more on 'Wheatly' and HERE to see the brochure from when the estate was for sale. Click HERE to see where 'Wheatly' stood on google earth. Photo from the Elizabeth Morgan Jay Etnier Hollins archives.

11 comments:

HalfPuddingHalfSauce said...

WOW, what an entrance! Another scale-to-reality photo.

Doug Floor Plan said...

My first thought was, "It looks like a univesity campus" & yet the structure still has a residential feel to it. That McKim, Mead, & White -- they knew what they were doing, huh?

James said...

Great picture! I love seeing the chapel and water tower off to the left. What a shame that it's gone. Would have been a great building to convert to a residence.

The Ancient said...

What, no portcullis?

Zach said...

From the NYPost this morning...developer Aby Rosen purchased the A.C. Goodyear estate in Old Westbury for $3.4 million.

http://www.oldlongisland.com/2011/01/a-conger-goodyear-estate.html

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/business/realestate/residential/jennifer_gramersees_lRe20sR5JAbEbpIxHATLqK

Anonymous said...

With each new photo of Wheatly posted, I fall more and more in love with this place. A real damn shame this gem was not saved.

Doug Floor Plan said...

Ancient, I confess I had to look up 'portcullis' -- LOL.

ElyseB said...

I just walked my dogs there this morning! It's like seeing a ghost... I had thought that the main entrance was from Clock Tower East but this is clearly Clock Tower Lane. (no cobblestones)
what a massive entrance...

The Down East Dilettante said...

"Honey, we're Home". As in "be it ever so humble, there's no place like..."

Definitely a place that captures the imagination

The Down East Dilettante said...

Nothing I read about Morgan gives much hint about how he happened to be the sort of client who inspires architects to such imaginative work as the two houses McKim Mead & White did for him, and vice versa. On the surface it all seems the usual stuff---financier, sailor, sportsman, etc. I'd be curious to know more. The man clearly had highly evolved taste.

wooded bliss said...

just as a factoid:
One of the homes carved out after the main residence was torn down, was owned by Monty Waterbury Jr.; son of the very famous international polo player.