Friday, June 22, 2012

The Lucien Oudin Jr. Estate

 The Lucien Oudin Jr. estate designed by Grosvenor Atterbury c. 1900 in Water Mill.  Oudin, an attorney, was partner in the firms of Oudin & Oakley and later Oudin, Kilbreth & Schackno.  He was also a member of the New York City Art Commission.  After the death of Oudin's father in 1868 his mother remarried Judge James T. Kilbreth, a Police Magistrate of New York City and later Collector of the Port of New York.  The Kilbreths had been staying in Southampton as early as 1875 and were among the first summer colonists.  Click HERE to see the Oudin estate on google earth and HERE on bing.









Photos from American Homes and Gardens, 1908.

11 comments:

The Ancient said...

Has anyone seen recent pictures of the interior?

The Ancient said...

There's the addition of the rear porch, the conversion of the stables to what appears to be a guest house, and the construction of a house that resembles an Exxon station on a former corner of the property.

How many other exterior changes are visible?

DFP -- What can you tell from the original floor plan?

Anonymous said...

On BING...if you go over to "Villa Maria", they have a very good article about the development of estates on Long Island.

They also mention a 155 acre estate for sale (in 2005), owned by Gordon Phipps in Old Westbury. Does anybody know what estate this is, and where it was?

Zach said...

^ Never heard of a Gordon Phipps...and the whole thing sounds highly unlikely.

Perhaps they are confused with Ogden.

archibuff said...

There is also a two storey addition on the north facade, probably to provide necessary bathroom spaces or a master suite.

Looks like this place dropped in straight from moose country. Charming stable building and the flower boxed bay window at the stair landing is a very nice exterior detail. The addition of the spacious deck facing the water helps provide useful outdoor space. Other than that, not a huge fan of the rustic craftsman style interiors with Victorian bric-a-brac clutter.

The Devoted Classicist said...

The Stable showed a Swiss influence sometimes seen in shingled buildings of this period. Charming.

Anonymous said...

When Spring Hill was offered for sale - wasn't that 153 acres or 155? That would be Ogden as Zach says.

commentator8 said...

Very curious that this house has the bathroom setup of a home built in 1800, not 1900.

Maybe the Oudins held it in 'til Monday?

The Ancient said...

Maybe Oudin hired the last living servants in Southampton willing to cope with chamberpots. Or perhaps that narrow second story porch was actually a six holler.

(My own guess is that the drawings don't represent the finished house.)

Anonymous said...

What a bunch of snots. I wonder what your house looks like

The Ancient said...

Anon 2:02 --

Hey, I like this house.