Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Really?

The headline on Yahoo is 'The fanciest McDonald's in the U.S.' and it links to an article on the McDonald's that exists inside the 18th century Denton House residence in New Hyde Park.  I suppose old Long Island possessing the fanciest McDonald's is a far better claim than having the ugliest, though it still sounds weird.  Click HERE to see Denton House on google street view.

9 comments:

Kellsboro Jack said...

William Shopsin, AIA, in his book "Preserving American Mansion & Estates" (1994, McGraw-Hill) identified and praised the Denton House. In particular it being an example of efforts between the community and a corporation to allow a home (which was long before already compromised by commercial occupants) to have a dignified and self-supporting function.

No chance it would've been a home again and honestly few big corps would touch such a home if there were bylaws the size of a phone book to meet.

The firm of Raymond F. Fellman, AIA, in Amityville restored the exterior and interior was completed by NYC-based Haverson Rockwell Architects.

l'il gay boy said...

Holy shit.

"The fanciest McDonald's" is somewhat akin to saying "the loveliest sewage treatment plant" -- but I guess preserving the envelope is still better than the usual franchise nightmare.

Put in mind of when they tore down the Wetson's on Sunrise Highway in Valley Stream -- one of the first of the drive-in burger joints in the area...

Anonymous said...

Did you read about the French chateau razed "by mistake" this week?

Zach said...

I was thinking of posting a link to that article but it was just too depressing.

It takes an imbecile of titanic proportions to make that sort of mistake.

http://news.yahoo.com/18th-century-french-chateau-razed-mistake-124226251.html

Anonymous said...

Not to be doubtful about a firm razing an historic structure in France without asking any questions beforehand but the Russian billionaire who supposedly ordered the outbuildings demolished and the chateau restored said he would immediately build a brand new replica of the chateau. Now maybe just maybe that was the plan all along? A new improved version of the old, creaking, drafty original.

That story and reading about the shady real estate and bankruptcy dealings of the couple who wanted to purchase Trumbauers Mainline chateau only to now be accused by the seller of starting the fire themselves to collect a hefty insurance claim makes me cautious of taking anything at face value anymore.

JohnM said...

I think you could get the golden arches to fit nicely on top of each pair of chimneys.

I wonder if they thought of that?

Anonymous said...

When I was a kid it was a restaurant called Dallas Ribs. No, we never ate there.

Kellsboro Jack said...

There is an old adage that sadly is used in business - "it's easier to ask for forgiveness than ask for permission" - hence the "we're sorry" of razing the chateau.

The Down East Dilettante said...

Oh my. where to begin? We have the second fanciest McDonald's here in Maine, in Freeport, the result of a similarly brokered deal to save a 19th century house. I'd call the results mixed.

The chateau is a serious tragedy---and methinks I smell a rat---what a lovely building---the 18th century French did that kind of elegant restraint better than anyone. One doubts the 'exact' copy will be as good.