Saturday, May 22, 2010

'Overland House'

'Overland House', the estate of George Rose designed by Hoppin & Koen c. 1910 in Old Westbury. Click HERE for more on 'Overland House'. Click HERE to see where 'Overland House' stood on google earth, it had been badly damaged by a fire in 1952 and was subsequently razed.

16 comments:

The Down East Dilettante said...

One can almost always tell a Hoppin & Koen house----they have a few signature touches, and always tended to crowd a little too much in. One of the exceptions is Edith Wharton's the Mount, where occasionally the composition has slight awkwardness and crowding, but one assumes the strong client (and the ghost of Ogden Codman's original scheme) kept things simpler. Hopping & Koen sure loved those palladian windows set in shallow arches...and three story central blocks...and lots of wedding cake decoration

HalfPuddingHalfSauce said...

SPLIA calls the place "Bennett Cottage"? Maps put property here -

http://www.historicaerials.com/?poi=11207

Wedged in between Rosemary Hall/Foxland and the Bliss estate.

http://wikimapia.org/#lat=40.7838722&lon=-73.5978842&z=17&l=0&m=b

HalfPuddingHalfSauce said...

Looks better then the Gotti place.

I added a link to the full article from Architectural Record for Shoremond, the other Hoppin & Koen designed estate.

http://wikimapia.org/#lat=40.9612339&lon=-73.4044647&z=11&l=0&m=b&show=/5539207/Shoremonde

Gives a nice description of the place along with the photos that are posted here.

16 Playhouses plus 3

http://wikimapia.org/#lat=40.8629007&lon=-73.5215378&z=16&l=0&m=b&show=/9446015/Northwood-Stables-Indoor-Tennis-Courtod-Stables-Indoor-Tennis-Court



Looking for correct or additional info on this one.

http://wikimapia.org/#lat=40.8788225&lon=-73.5038352&z=18&l=0&m=b&show=/16394696/LIGC-Indoor-Tennis-Court


The Whitney's had 2 structures, I'll count them as 1.

http://wikimapia.org/#lat=40.8023428&lon=-73.5987425&z=18&l=0&m=b


So thats 19 so far. What else am I missing?

Little trivia - what LIGC individual from this group is connected to a hair cut style????

HalfPuddingHalfSauce said...

No. There not listed in the Long Island Social Register.

The Ancient said...

TDED --

I'm so glad you said that about Wharton's house.

P.S. Real estate trivia: When she was 20, Wharton and her mother stayed at 7 Washington Square North, a house built (1831-1833) by John Johnston, and inherited in 1851 by his son, John Taylor Johnston, who lived around the corner at 8 Fifth Avenue. JTJ's mother stayed in the house until her death in 1879, whereupon JTJ gave the house to his eldest child, Emily Johnston de Forest. She rented the house out for several years before occupying it herself, along with her husband Robert Weeks de Forest. The de Forests had several properties, but to the best of my knowledge the only one left in the family is Wawapek Farm in Cold Spring Harbor.

ChipSF said...

HPHS -
I had the Whitney's gym & courts counted in my 16 on now up to 18.

The Ancient said...

HalfPuddingHalfSauce --

I'll take Jock Whitney and crew-cuts for $100.

HalfPuddingHalfSauce said...

Buzz-cut for a penny - we have a winner! Somehow his rowing days at Yale............

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Hay_Whitney


http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1533405/bio

http://www.google.com/images?q=jock+whitney&um=1&hl=en&newwindow=1&tbs=isch:1&sa=N&start=0&ndsp=21

HalfPuddingHalfSauce said...

Wow - just found out An Aesthete's Lament closed down the site. I hope will still see the prose here.

Continuing with Jock Whitney...
Have you seen his yacht?

http://www.brooklinboatyard.com/aphrodite.html

Was suppose to go to Center Harbor Maine. Article also mentions Mr. Whitney's large 2-story boathouse he embarked from for the commute to Wall Street. Does anyone know where this stood?

Thanks

HalfPuddingHalfSauce said...

Does this make 19?

http://wikimapia.org/#lat=40.7827166&lon=-73.6085808&z=19&l=0&m=b

The Down East Dilettante said...

Ancient, I think the HABS website has pictures of Washington Sq. when the DeForests were still in residence. All that old New York, vanished like the Aztec Empire only 75 or a hundred years later.

The Down East Dilettante said...

Half Pudding----funny you mention Aphrodite. Only a couple of days ago I was admiring a salvaged panel from her sitting in a friend's workshop. (Replaced by all new). I live only 14 miles from Center Harbor, and saw her a couple of times during the restoration, and I remember all the buzz when she was launched. She was breathtaking in the water.

The Down East Dilettante said...

Oh, and PS Half Pudding

The Whitney boathouse/seaplane hangar/party house still stands, I do believe.

The Ancient said...

TDED --

In my experience, the best web-based pictures can be found on the NY Public Library's site, and at the Library of Congress (what you call the HABS website). The Museum of the City of New York has stupendous things, but they are not online.

The LOC site has documentary material as well as pictures, including a pretty funny write-up on the block by Emily de Forest, written in her eighties. The Public Library site has what are probably the best web-accessible pictures, all exterior shots, but they're sometimes mislabeled. In other words, you have to know what you're looking at.

Best.

P.S. Maybe Zach can contrive a post on Wawapek. (There are still Aztecs, here and there.)

The Down East Dilettante said...

LOL, Ancient, you're a step ahead of me. Indeed one still finds a few of those Aztecs here and there, including in my own village---but finding them in Manhattan, in their 19th century habitat is getting more and more difficult...

As for the Habs component of the Library of Congress Website, one can only hope that the material is better stored and catalogued in hard copy than digitally. Mislabeling is, as you mention, absolutely rampant on the site, as is incomplete documentation. Very sad---disturbing in fact.

The Ancient said...

Indeed one still finds a few of those Aztecs here and there, including in my own village---but finding them in Manhattan, in their 19th century habitat is getting more and more difficult...

(For the benefit of researchers who wind up on this thread -- and many will because Google seems to love Zach -- I'll stretch this out one post further.)

Emily de Forest knew that, and so she bought up most of the houses on The Row. This allowed her to populate it with her friends and family into the 1930s -- at which time the underlying lease ran out.

[Enter NYU, Destroyer of Neighborhoods, Stage Right.]