Tuesday, March 22, 2011

'The Chimneys' Interiors

The accompanying interiors to 'The Chimneys', the Howard C. Brokaw estate designed by Horace Trumbauer c. 1916 in Brookville. Click HERE for more on 'The Chimneys'.





Photos from the Library of Congress.

10 comments:

magnus said...

I know that some disagree, but I love Trumbauer's work and his sense of proportion. As huge as it is, The Chimneys, like so much of Trumbauer's work is highly agreeable to me

The Devoted Classicist said...

While the furnishings are too "leggy" for my personal style, the architecture of the interior is classic good taste. Not that there are things that I would not change if starting over today, but there are lessons here to be learned.

The Down East Dilettante said...

It's a good house. Safe, but handsome.

Doug Floor Plan said...

I agree with Magnus in being a fan of Horace Trumbauer’s work. One of the best comments I’ve read about his skill with proportions was that, regardless of size, & many of his house designs were huge, the structure still looked like a private residence. I think this ‘The Chimneys’ is a good example of that & mention this only because I previously criticized ‘Indian Neck Hall’ for failing to look like a private residence.

lil' gay boy said...

I think Trumbauer was one of the few architects who was able to sublimate his instincts in order to satisfy a client; where said client was educable, he would do so. If not, he would try and, failing that, would give the client what he wanted (I.e. Indian Neck Hall), whilst maintaining, as best he could, the high standards he set for himself.

The man had an impeccable sense of proportion, and as many before have previously noted, despite the size of the project ––– from the smallest pied-a-terre to the most monumental manse, his work possessed an intimacy of scale and warm domesticity that his clients craved.

As for this particular decor –––meh. But my God, what bones! Exquisite.

Security word - dookefu: a clumsily-made Japanese bean curd.

Zach said...

LGB -

'Indian Neck Hall' was by Ernest Flagg, along with the later alterations... I figured you got your large houses mixed up.

lil' gay boy said...

That's exactly why we have you...I was thinking of La Lanterne.

HalfPuddingHalfSauce said...

13 chimneys = 26 fireplaces.
One important fact regarding Trumbauer that doesn't get a lot of mention - Trumbauer's chief assistant did much of the design work for many of the firms projects. Julian Abele was America's first distinguished black architects. Described as Trumbauer's aesthetic alter-ego who would take Trumbauer's rough sketches, then refine and compose renderings and elevations.

The Down East Dilettante said...

No doubt about it that Trumbauer's work became far more elegant, and exacting of proportion and detail after Abele came, bringing with him his first hand knowledge of French design.

LGB, I have to question 'intimacy of scale'. A lot of Trumbauer houses are designed on an 18 inch foot, and while graceful, and lovely, intimate scale is not the first concept that comes to mind.

FrancophileJohn said...

Trumbauer hired Abele so that so says a lot as well.

The Chimneys rooms are far too big and look almost empty.